August Amassadors - Our Uromastyx Lizards!

Our August animal ambassadors are our two Uromastyx lizards, Petrie and Little Foot! They are cousins who came into our lives in January of 2016. We searched high and low for Uromastyx (also known as ‘Uros’) which were captive bred and not wild caught. The search was difficult as the majority available in the US are caught and imported. Just as we were about to give up on the search, we found our two animal ambassadors! These little ones were captive bred by a responsible US breeder and we are so happy to give them a permanent home here at Zovargo. With any pet it is super important to ensure it is either a rescue or from a responsible breeder who can provide proof it was not wild caught. This is crucial for two reasons, firstly it is very unethical to simply take an animal from the wild as it will contribute to population disruptions and will be a very distressing change for the individual animal. Secondly, for your own safety and enjoyment the behaviour of a wild animal is likely to be more unpredictable and dangerous, which means interactions with the animal will be stressful for both owner and animal.

Photo Credit: Jorge Ibarra

Photo Credit: Jorge Ibarra

The name Uromastyx is derived from ancient Greek words meaning ‘tail’ and ‘whip’.  This is likely due to their distinctive large tails which they are known for whipping around when stressed or in defensive action. There are at least eighteen recognized species of Uros, and many subspecies which live across the globe, strictly north of the equator. Our Uros are the Saharan species, which as the name suggest hail from the Saharan Desert. Being from of the hottest places on the earth, these reptiles require a hot environment. They thrive in temperatures up to 130 degrees and they enjoy basking on rocks under the heat. Despite their love of hot, dry temperatures, Uros can still overheat (resulting in the behaviour of breathing with their mouths open), and will need a burrow, shady spot or cooler area of their enclosure to chill out in.

Their diet is 100% fresh spring mix salad and leafy greens. For many species of Uromastyx healthy specimens typically get all the water they need from their vegetable diet, they have special glands near their nose which excrete mineral salts to help conserve the small amounts of water they take in. However, some species drink more than others, and some life events (such as pregnancy) may lead to increased drinking requirements. Uromastyx are not an easy pet to keep, primarily due to their specific habitat requirements. Only once you have truly read up on the care they need, and understand they may live to thirty years old, and grow more than thirty inches long (in the case of the Eygyptian Uro anyway!) should you begin seeking a Uromastyx pet.

Photo Credit: Jorge Ibarra

Photo Credit: Jorge Ibarra

Reference:
http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Care-Sheets/Uromastyx-Lizard/